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Justicia americana (water willow)
a little known plant from America, airy stems with small willow like leaves develop exquisite pink/lavender and white mottled orchid-like flowers in midsummer. I can hardly propagate enough of it and it often sells out early in the season. Great for the smaller pool.
• Height 50cm
• Full sun

£4.00
 
Leycesteria Formosa (shrimp bush, pheasant berry)
a naturalised shrubby plant with evergreen jointed canes bearing clusters of drooping purple flowers followed by dark purple fruits, much in demand by birds
•Height 3 metres
• Any position

£4.00
 
LIGULARIA: I keep a very wide range of Ligularia species, hybrids and cultivars. Like Rodgersia, these plants have become widely hybridised and the species are supplied in good faith. One glance at the Google page for any Ligularia will illustrate the difficulty in identification. All Ligularias are attractive garden plants, with large leaves and yellow or orange flowers in a wide range of habits. Some, like L clivorum and L przewalskii, self-seed wilfully and can be a bit of a nuisance, while one or two species and some of the hybrids rarely produce viable seed. Most will take full sun as long as there is plenty of moisture at the roots, but none like to be saturated. However, a situation shaded in the hottest part of the day is preferred. Even with plentiful water leaves may wilt on hot days. Ligularias can quickly cover large areas as ground cover with the bonus of big tropical type foliage and bright flowers over a long season.
 
Ligularia “Britt-Marie Crawford”
one of the best purple leaved hybrids with strong purple colouration on the stems and upper and lower sides of the rounded leaves. Orange daisy flowers complement the leaves. Gradually makes a mound about 60cm high and 90cm wide.
£4.00
 
     
Ligularia dentata “Desdemona”
round dark green leaves with purple/magenta undersides. Generally darker than “Othello” though I’ve seen very different plants purporting to be one or the other.

£3.20
Ligularia dentata “Othello”
one of the original selections, it still holds up well; the plants sold now have become more variable but have rounded toothed leaves with dark plummy upper and crimson undersides and leaf stems, offset by orange daisy type flowers in flat topped clusters. Similar to Desdemona.

£3.20
Ligularia “Dragons Breath”
a new hybrid for smaller gardens, more compact with lobed and dissected leaves. I also have L Dragons Wings, a very similar plant but with a different leaf form; same price. Please specify variety required.

£4.00
Ligularia fischeri
a tough small species to about 80cm high, rounded to heart shaped leaves are green both sides, rapidly spreading to form large weed suppressing clumps. Very useful for filling large areas, flowers are yellow spikes.


£4.00
 
Ligularia “Hingston Hybrids”
my own seed grown selected hybrids in a range of leaf forms and colours; an economic way of planting up larger areas.

£2.80
 
Ligularia japonica “Rising Sun”
a medium to large plant with lobed and dissected leaves like a cheeseplant and orangey yellow daisy type flowers.

£6.00
 
Ligularia “Osiris Fantaisie”
a new hybrid with fantastic ruffled purple leaves, quite compact and with orangey yellow daisy flowers.

£4.00
 
Ligularia palmatiloba
a sterile hybrid with light green palmate and dissected leaves with big sprays of orange flowers to about 2 metres. One of the best; and no nuisance seedlings.

£4.00
 
Ligularia przewalskii
one of the best known selections and the one with the most dissected leaves. Leaf stems are black, flowers are tall yellow candles to about 1.8 metres. Often confused with L. stenocephala “The Rocket”. Another similar hybrid is Zepter.

£3.20
 
       
Ligularia stenocephala “The Rocket”
a tall plant with black stems and triangular dissected leaves, tall spires of small yellow flowers emerge to about 2 metres. One of the oldest selections.
Sold Out
 
Ligularia tangutica (Chinese groundsel, syn Senecio tangutica)
A shorter species with a rather different habit. Spreads by underground stems and is reputed to be invasive; I haven’t found it so. Branched spikes of yellow flowers on rather handsome dissected leaves..

£4.00
 
Ligularia veitchiana
This one has rounded shallowly toothed leaves with slightly puckered edges and more compact cone shaped flower heads in a pleasing shade of yellow, to about 1.5 metres.


£4.00
 
Ligularia wilsoniana
a more compact plant with almost round leaves with perfect fine cog-like toothing. The flower spike is narrow with smallish flowers in profusion.


£4.00
 
Lysimachia punctata (dotted loosestrife)
A vigorous, some might say thuggish native perennial able to adapt to almost all soil conditions from dry shade to sunny bog. Stems with slightly felty spear shaped leaves produce whorls of yellow flowers at the nodes. Spreads rapidly in damp conditions by running stems. The variegated form is less vigorous and has pink, white and green variegation especially pleasing in Spring, however I don’t think it sets off the flowers so well. Any position, prefers damp and sunny.

£2.80
 
       
 
Lysimachia vulgaris (common loosestrife)
a much less stroppy loosestrife with spherical tufts of yellow spiky flowers.
• Height 80cm
• Full sun or part shade
£3.20
 
       
Lythrum "Robert"
A more compact form of loosestrife with more rose red flowers.
• Height 150cm
• Full sun
• Plant 0cm deep
£3.00
 
Matteucia struthiopteris (Shuttlecock fern)
One of a handful of “essential” plants in my opinion, great for light shade in damp soil, especially good on banks or under shrubs or trees that cast light shade. Great shuttlecocks of foliage unfurl in Spring, gradually forming an impressive clump. Mix with Osmunda regalis for a jungly effect.
• Height 1.2 metres
• Part Shade

£4.00
 
Mazus reptans (Chinese marshflower)
another low creeping plant, useful for covering pot or pond edges or as ground cover. Small leaves reminiscent of Campanula on spreading stems with prolific blue flowers about 1cm across. “Alba” is the white form. Not the hardiest of plants and might not be suitable for colder districts.
• Height 2cm

£3.20
 
Mazus reptans Alba
The white flowered version of Chinese marshflower.
• Height 2cm

£3.20
 
       
Osmunda regalis (Royal fern)
an impressive native fern with broad pinnae and brown spore carrying fronds making a good contrast. Ideal for damp shade, mix with Matteucia for great effect.
• Height 1.2 metres

£4.00
 
Peltiphyllum peltata (Darmera)
another useful plant for all but the smallest bog garden. Knobbly tubers send up pink pompoms of flowers in early Spring before the leaves emerge. Bronzy crumpled leaves then emerge on strong individual stems to form a canopy about 90cm high. Tubers are very good for reinforcing pond or stream banks to prevent erosion. A strong grower.
• Height 1.2 metres
• Sun or part shade

£2.80
 
Persicaria affinis
a great ground cover with pink or red candles throughout the season above small oval leaves that themselves colour up well in autumn in vibrant red shades. Vigorous, like most Persicarias. “Superba” has dark red flowers. “
• Height 20cm
• Sun or part shade

£2.80
 
Persicaria amplexicaulis Rosea
a slightly taller species, very late to flower in August to November, always a useful trait. Flowers are an attractive dark rose pink and offset well by the foliage.
•Height 80cm
• Sun or part shade

£3.20
 
Persicaria bistorta
another pretty plant that is deceptively thuggish. The dock-like leaves give it away, but it does have the most charming pink pokers of flowers from May till September and is fantastic ground cover for an awkward spot. Unfussy about soil or position, but in sun on a moist soil can spread alarmingly. Well worth the effort of keeping under control.
• Height 30cm
• Any position

£2.80
 
Persicaria polymorpha
One of the biggest in the family, a super specimen plant with plenty of white fluffy flowers held aloft on hollow stems like the dreaded knotweed. Well behaved and spreads steadily to form a fine clump..
•Height 2 metres
• Sun or part shade

£6.00
 
Physostegia virginiana (obedient plant)
not obedient at all! The “obedient” bit refers to the ability of flowers to be bent and remain where put, unfortunately the same is not true of the whole plant. A very vigorous spreader only suitable if you have a large area available. Pretty pink flowers are presented on tall spires in mid to late summer. “Rosea” is a strong pink.
• Height 1.5 metres
• Any position

£2.80
 
Potentilla palustris (Marsh cinquefoil)
Marsh cinquefoil has a somewhat shrubby habit with sprawling stems, height about 20m but spreading widely and occasionally rooting at the nodes. Unusual maroon flowers complement the interesting glaucous leaves. A useful plant for providing surface cover in smaller ponds.

£3.20
 
Ranunculus repens “Pleniflorus”
a pretty double buttercup with divided leaves and yellow pompom flowers, though leaves are not as dissected as its single cousin, the meadow buttercup. A useful plant in wilder areas, creeping habit but not invasive.
• Height 30cm
• Any position

£2.80
 
Rheum palmatum (Ornamental rhubarb)
a group of highly variable plants with large, rounded, palmate or dissected leaves which may be green, green with crimson or purple undersides, or all purple, especially in Spring. Leaves tend to revert to green as Summer progresses. Tall flower spikes are sent up in shades from white through pink to crimson.

Out of
Stock
 
RODGERSIA: Another highly variable genus that has become compromised through hybridisation. These really are fantastic plants for the damp shady areas in any garden, with big bronzy pinnate or palmate leaves, colourful stems and flower spikes in hues of pink and red, also white. There are dozens of named hybrids; many are rather similar so I keep a selection of the most interesting and different. These are propagated by division to maintain the type.
 
 
Rodgersia aesculifolia
large chestnut–like leaves to about 60cm across, flowers are usually white but “Henrici” has pinkish flowers and chocolate-bronze emerging foliage.

£4.00
 
Rodgersia pinnata
The best known and most widely available species; seed grown plants develop large pinnate leaves to 90cm across on 90cm high stems, flowers vary from white through pink to crimson. If you want R pinnata “Superba” rather than the species, I have this @ £5.00.

£4.00
 
Rodgersia podophylla
This species has large divided palmate leaves to over 1 metre and grows a little faster than most, soon producing an impressive clump. Flowers are usually white or greenish white, up to 1.5 metres high. I also have “Braunlaub” at the same price.

£4.00
 
Rodgersia sambucifolia
A relatively unusual species which has elder-like leaves and white flowers.

£4.00
 
Salvia uliginosa
Another oddity - a Salvia that likes wet conditions. Bog sage has the usual piercing blue flowers on tall stems. Hardy in our soft southern areas, maybe not further north. Flowers really late in September to November, a most useful habit.
• Height 180cm
• Full sun
£4.00
 
Silene dioica (Campion)
A well-known native wildflower, ubiquitous here in Devon. Flowers all season and readily self-seeds, pretty and easy, especially good for wildlife areas.
• Height 40cm
• Any soil and position
except heavy shade

£2.80
 
Succisa pratensis (Devil’s bit scabious)
Another useful late performer, flowering in September to October. Lovely lilac-blue pompoms freely produced on wiry stems above a rosette of floppy, slightly woolly leaves. Again native and good for wildlife plantings, always plastered in bees and butterflies.
• Height 80cm
• Full sun or part shade

£3.20
 
Thalictrum aquilegifolium (Rue)
Often mistaken for Aquilegia unless in flower, this airy and graceful plant produces flat heads of fluffy flowers in shades from white through mauve to purple in mid-summer. Black wiry stems accentuate the delicate foliage. Tough and easy, will readily self-seed.
• Height 1.2 metres
• Full sun or part shade

£2.80
 
       
Thalictrum delavayi
closely related to the above, this one has finer leaves and a very delicate look belying its tough nature. The long wiry stems can be damaged by high winds, but looks good planted to emerge through other foliage where the lovely mauve and white flowers can be appreciated.
• Height 1 metre
• Part shade

Out of
Stock
 
Thalictrum delavayi album
The white form of “delavayi”; a little shorter and finer but with gorgeous panicles of drooping white flowers.
• Height 80cm
• Part shade

£5.00
 
Trollius chinensis (Globe flower)
This is the Asian, basically orange globeflower. Many people dislike orange in a garden, but I feel that this mixes very well with yellow/orange Iris and Primula. Plentiful orange buttercups up to 5cm across are produced above strongly dissected buttercup type leaves from May onwards, regular deadheading will extend flowering to the end of summer.
• Height 1 metre
• Full sun or part shade

£2.80
 
 
Trollius europaeus (Globe flower)
The European globe flower. An exquisite native plant, evocative of unspoilt meadows. Emerging from a crown of divided buttercup-like leaves, the flowering stems support numerous lemon-yellow flowers like giant buttercups. Slow to establish, but builds to form a good clump. “Superbus” is an improved selection.
• Height 1 metre
• Full sun or part shade

£2.80
Trollius x cultorum: There is quite a range of garden hybrids, I keep some of the best including:
 
“Alabaster”
with a cream coloured flower, very desirable.
• Height 1.2 metres
• Full sun or part shade

£5.00
 
“Cheddar”
which, unsurprisingly, is a pastel cheese colour.
• Height 1.2 metres
• Full sun or part shade

£4.00
 
“Morning Sun”
pale orange.
• Height 1.2 metres
• Full sun or part shade

Out of Stock
 
“New Moon”
similar to Alabaster.
• Height 1.2 metres
• Full sun or part shade

£4.00
 
       
 
 
     
   
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